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Ed and Lorraine Warren: Paranormal Investigators

Posted by Alex Alexander • January 12, 2016

Ed and Lorraine Warren

 

Ed and Lorraine Warren’s investigations into some of the most interesting and controversial paranormal events of the past four decades have spawned best sellers and successful movies.

 

In 1952, the Warrens founded the New England Society for Psychic Research, the oldest ghost hunting group in New England. They are also the authors of several books about the paranormal and their investigations into reports of paranormal activity.

 

Popular cases

 

Amityville haunting

One of the Warren’s most famous and well known investigations was into the recorded hauntings of a home in Amityville Long Island, New York. The events were the basis for the book The Amityville Horror by Jay Anson and the movie by the same name.

 

George and Kathy Lutz claimed their house was haunted by a violent, demonic presence that was so intense that it eventually drove them out of their home. Even though The Amityville Horror Conspiracy authors Stephen and Roxanne Kaplan claimed the case was a hoax, Lorraine Warren held to the statement that it was real.

 

The Amityville Horror has been questioned by several critics. According to Benjamin Radford, the story was “refuted by eyewitnesses, investigations and forensic evidence.

 

Demon murder

Arne Johnson was accused of killing his landlord, Alan Bono, in 1981. Ed and Lorraine Warren were called prior to the killing to investigate an alleged demonic possession of the younger brother of Johnson’s fiancée.

 

The Warrens determined that Johnson was also possessed, and at his trial, Johnson attempted to plead Not Guilty by Reason of Demonic Possession, but the plea was unsuccessful. The case was later covered in the 1983 book The Devil in Connecticut by Gerald Brittle.

 

Annabelle

In another one of their more popular cases, in 1970, two roommates claimed their vintage Raggedy Ann doll was possessed by the spirit of a young girl named Annabelle Higgins.

 

The Warrens took the doll and told the roommates that it was being manipulated by an inhuman presence. The Warrens had a special display case built for the doll, because they claimed it kept getting out of all the other cases they tried putting it in, and put it on display at the family’s “Occult Museum”. This case lead to the loosely based 2014 film Annabelle directed by John R. Leonetti.

 

Perron family

In 1971, the Warrens claimed that the Harrisville, Rhode Island, home of the Perron family was haunted by a witch who lived there in the early 19th century. They claimed Bathsheba Sherman cursed the land so that whoever lived there somehow died.

 

The case was turned into the 2013 film, The Conjuring and Lorraine Warren was a consultant on the production and also appeared in a cameo role in the film.

 

In 1986, The Warrens proclaimed the Snedeker house, a former funeral home, to be infested with demons. The case was featured in the 1992 book In a Dark Place: The Story of a True Haunting. A TV movie that later became part of the Discovery Channel series A Haunting was produced in 2002 and a film that was very loosely based on the events, directed by Peter Cornwell, was released in 2009.
Whether or not you believe in what Ed and Lorraine Warren have accomplished or what they did as a profession, one thing I think everyone will agree on, they have really had adventurous lives.

 

Thank you very much for your interest in my blog. Please check back often for more interesting, educational and entertaining articles on the paranormal. I will also use this blog to update my valued and loyal fans on news, appearances, book giveaways and information about my books.

 

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Edgar Allan Poe: The Master of Mystery and the Macabre

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